English grammar

Module 15, Troublesome Words 2, Lesson 23:

Notable vs. Notorious, Notoriety

Score:
English grammar
Prompt:
"Notable" and "noted" are used chiefly of persons or things that are remarkable or distinguished for favorable reasons. Examples: 1) The notable remark will be remembered for a long time. 2) The noted author spoke at a local club.
"Notorious" is now almost always used to mean of ill repute. In other words, if someone is known for doing something bad, he or she is "notorious." Example: The notorious outlaw was hunted by the law.
"Notoriety," likewise, means unfavorable publicity or distinction. Example: She did not want any more notoriety.

Practice What You've Learned

English grammar
Directions:
Click to select the correct word usage in the following sentences.
1.
A person who is very distinguished in his/her profession is considered (notable) (notorious).
2.
A criminal might become famous through his/her (notable) (notorious) behavior.
3.
Einstein was a very (notable) (notorious) scientist.
4.
Al Capon was a very (notable) (notorious) gangster.
5.
Sometimes a person's misdeeds cause a degree of (notable fame) (notoriety).
6.
The candidate is a reputable and (noted) (notorious) teacher.
7.
Notoriety is a form of fame received for (notable) (notorious) behavior.
8.
(Notable) (Notorious) people become famous because of their offenses, crimes, or general lack of integrity.
9.
(Notable) (Notorious) people become famous for their outstanding service.
10.
Our mayor is a very accomplished and (notable) (notorious) person.
11.
As a rock star, he has gained a degree of (notable fame) (notoriety) for his classic rock music.
12.
Notoriety may make a person famous, but notoriety will not make a person (notable) (notorious).
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