English grammar

Module 4, Sentence Parts, Lesson 2:

Simple Predicates

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English grammar
Definition:
The simple predicate of a sentence is the verb that is done in the sentence. It can be the action that happens, the state of being, or the linking verb.
Hint:
Ask yourself, "The subject did what?" It can help if you find the subject first.
Carlos wrote a letter to his uncle. (Carlos did what? He wrote.)
My neighbor's dog barked all night. (Dog did what? It barked.)
Hint:
A verb phrase is considered a single idea; therefore, it is still a simple predicate.
Fred Mosby will be my new tutor.
The police officer had explained what happened.
Hint:
Not is not a verb. Therefore, it cannot be part of the simple predicate. Be careful when dealing with contractions.
I don't want spaghetti for dinner again.
I do not want spaghetti for dinner again.

Practice What You've Learned

English grammar
Directions:
Use the toolbar above to underline the subject of each sentence once and the verb of each sentence twice. Remember to include helping verbs.
1.
Roses bloom in my backyard.
2.
My next door neighbor lives in an old firehouse.
3.
Jeremiah will be coming to our house for the weekend.
4.
The performer danced across the stage.
5.
Ancient people believed in magic.
6.
Those gummy candies are delicious.
7.
Your teacher does not want your rough draft instead.
8.
Allison's new car already needs a new battery.
9.
My favorite actor's new action movie is playing in theaters this weekend.
10.
Leading scientists have accepted his theory as fact.
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