English grammar

Module 4:

Review Sentence Parts

Score:
English grammar
English grammar

Simple Subjects

Directions:
Use the toolbar above to underline the subject in each sentence.
1.
The blue umbrella is mine.
2.
Micah's homemade battery needs more water.
3.
Twelve soldiers in that unit successfully freed the prisoners.
4.
The fourth grade students did very well on their English test.
5.
The landscapers accidentally mowed through my uncle's prize petunias.

Simple Predicates

Directions:
Use the toolbar above to underline the subject of each sentence once and the verb of each sentence twice. Remember to include helping verbs.
6.
The kindergarteners played happily in their playgound for hours.
7.
The hurricane knocked over two trees in our front yard.
8.
Your truck will not start today.
9.
Christine visits Austria each summer.
10.
The U.S. Marines used Navajo Indians as Code Talkers in World War II.

Challenging Subjects

Directions:
Use the toolbar above to underline the subject of each sentence once and the verb of each sentence twice. The subject may be the understood you included at the end of each sentence.
11.
The letter from my grandmother arrived yesterday. (you)
12.
Down the mountain skied the expert skier. (you)
13.
Will Eddie get his project done on time? (you)
14.
Listen to me. (you)
15.
Here are your graded tests. (you)

Compound Subjects and Predicates

Directions:
Use the toolbar above to underline the subject(s) of each sentence once and the verb(s) of each sentence twice. Do not include the conjunctions. After each sentence, decide if the previous question had a compound subject, compound predicate, or both.
16.
The squirrels and chipmunks were scavenging for seeds and hiding them in secret places.
17.
compound subject / compound predicate / both
18.
The ancient Chinese and the ancient Greeks made amazing scientific discoveries for their times.
19.
compound subject / compound predicate / both
20.
My new strawberry plants are withering and dying in this heat.
21.
compound subject / compound predicate / both
22.
The wind and rain rattled the windows and kept me awake.
23.
compound subject / compound predicate / both
24.
Flashlights and batteries are necessary for emergency preparations.
25.
compound subject / compound predicate / both

Complete Subjects and Predicates

Directions:
Use the toolbar above to underline the simple subject once and the verb of each sentence twice. Then click on the space between the complete subject and complete predicate to put a dividing line between the halves.
26.
Our | trip | to | Germany | has | been | planned | for | August.
27.
You | should | use | a | pencil | on | that | math | test.
28.
The | sword | in | the | stone | was | removed | by | the | future | king.
29.
Up | the | river | swam | the | spawning | salmon.
30.
A | mermaid | might | appear | near | the | boat.

Direct Objects

Directions:
Use the toolbar above to mark up the sentence. Underline the subject once, the verb twice, and circle the direct object.
31.
That used car has four new tires.
32.
This box contains your baby clothes.
33.
These cookies do not have peanuts.
34.
No two elements have the same atomic number.
35.
During the Renaissance, Michelangelo created many beautiful marble sculptures.

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

Directions:
Identify each verb as transitive or intransitive.
36.
Jerome loves spaghetti.
transitive / intransitive
37.
Elaine runs often.
transitive / intransitive
38.
We will be coming tomorrow.
transitive / intransitive
39.
Walruses eat fish.
transitive / intransitive
40.
Europeans colonized Africa.
transitive / intransitive

Challenges with Direct Objects

Directions:
Use the toolbar above to mark up the sentence. Underline the subject once, the verb twice, and circle the direct object.
41.
Where will we find the next clue?
42.
Which car would you buy?
43.
In Germany, we will visit several cathedrals and many castles.
44.
What message should I send?
45.
Sammi should answer either my text or my email.

Indirect Objects

Directions:
Use the toolbar above to mark up the sentences. Underline the subject once. Underline the verb twice. Circle the direct object. Draw an arrow from the direct object to the indirect object.
46.
That vaccine should spare children the pain of that disease.
47.
Mrs. Neilson might award Kelly the social studies award.
48.
The change in times should allow us some more flexibility.
49.
My mother cooked my father his favorite dinner.
50.
Will Shawn bring his elderly neighbor some groceries?
51.
The old Comanche Indian told the class his story of being a Code Talker.

Subject Complements

Directions:
Use the toolbar above to mark up the sentences. Underline the subject once. Underline the verb twice. Underline the subject complement once (like the subject it completes). Then on the next line, identify the complement you chose as a predicate noun, predicate pronoun, or predicate adjective.
52.
My dog has stayed loyal to me.
53.
predicate noun / predicate pronoun / predicate adjective
54.
We are so tired after the long field trip.
55.
predicate noun / predicate pronoun / predicate adjective
56.
Those brownies are a gift for our new neighbors.
57.
predicate noun / predicate pronoun / predicate adjective
58.
The captain of our team will remain she.
59.
predicate noun / predicate pronoun / predicate adjective
60.
These shoes seem too tight.
61.
predicate noun / predicate pronoun / predicate adjective

Object Complements

Directions:
Use the toolbar above to mark up the sentences. Underline the subject once. Underline the verb twice. Circle the direct object. Put a dotted line under the object complement.
62.
My older sister calls her boyfriend Boogieboo.
63.
Jaime considers our math teacher a friend.
64.
Mike painted his new car black.
65.
The voters might elect the other candidate President of the United States.
66.
Monica's gossip makes me angry.

Distinguishing Objects and Complements

Directions:
Identify each bold-faced word as a direct object, indirect object, or subject complement.
67.
Your Halloween costume is scary!
direct object / indirect object / subject complement
68.
He showed me the text messages.
direct object / indirect object / subject complement
69.
Dinosaurs once roamed the earth.
direct object / indirect object / subject complement
70.
That clipboard is mine.
direct object / indirect object / subject complement
71.
The archeologist showed her team the discoveries.
direct object / indirect object / subject complement

Classifying Verbs

Directions:
Identify each bold-faced verb as transitive action, intransitive action, or intransitive linking.
72.
That dirt bike looks fast.
intransitive action / transitive action / intransitive linking
73.
We always go to the beach in the summer.
intransitive action / transitive action / intransitive linking
74.
The mother pulled the blanket up over her sleeping child.
intransitive action / transitive action / intransitive linking
75.
His car drives more smoothly than mine.
intransitive action / transitive action / intransitive linking
76.
Stefan became a lawyer.
intransitive action / transitive action / intransitive linking
Score: