English grammar

Module 2, Pronouns, Lesson 3:

Challenging Uses of Cases

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English grammar

There are several types of sentences that cause confusion about whether to use a subject or object pronoun: sentences with a compound subject or object; sentences with a pronoun followed directly by a noun; and sentences that use pronouns after than or as. After this lesson, you'll be much more confident about which pronouns to use in these tricky situations.

Pronouns in Compounds

In sentences that use two pronouns or a noun and a pronoun together, it's easy to become confused about which pronoun to use. If you're not sure which one is correct, consider whether it's part of the subject (doing the action) or part of the object (either receiving the action or after a preposition). Sometimes a pronoun may sound right to you, but you can't always trust your ears. Be especially careful with I and me, which are two of the most common offenders.

Common Error #1: Using Object Pronouns in Place of Subject Pronouns

Error Correction
Jesse and me went to school. Jesse and I went to school.
Him and me bought a new puppy last week. He and I bought a new puppy last week.
Me and them took the bus. We took the bus.

Notice how in the last example it would sound strange to say they and I, so the best solution is to combine the two pronouns into the single pronoun we.

Common Error #2: Using Subject Pronouns in Place of Object Pronouns

Error Correction
He met Jeremy and I. He met Jeremy and me.
Nancy hit Will and I. Nancy hit Will and me.
Is that hot fudge sundae for Carlos and I? Is that hot fudge sundae for Carlos and me?
My brother sat right between you and I. My brother sat right between you and me.

The last two examples use object pronouns because they come after prepositions (for and between).

Hint:
To decide whether you need to use a subject pronoun or an object pronoun, cross out the other pronoun or noun, and use the pronoun that sounds correct when it stands alone.

Jesse and I went to school. (You would say I went, not me went.)
Nancy hit you and me. (You would say Nancy hit me, not Nancy hit I.)
Is that hot fudge sundae for Carlos and me? (You would say for me, not for I.)

Pronoun order can be another tricky topic when dealing with compounds. Writing convention suggests that, out of courtesy, when using the first person pronouns I or me, we generally put these pronouns last, allowing the other names and pronouns to go first.

Sam and I saw a movie on Saturday.
I wrote a story about my cat and me. (Not me and my cat.)

Pronouns Before Nouns

Sometimes for clarity or emphasis, writers use a pronoun and a noun together. People often use an object pronoun when they mean to use a subject pronoun, and vice versa.

Error Correction
Us writers enjoy writing fiction. We writers enjoy writing fiction.
The teacher explained the lesson to we students. The teacher explained the lesson to us students.
Hint:
To decide whether you are using the correct pronoun, ignore the noun and see whether the pronoun is correct on its own.

We writers enjoy writing fiction. (Not Us enjoy writing fiction.)
The teacher explained the lesson to us students. (Not explained the lesson to we.)

Pronouns After Than or As

When sentences use than or as to compare, it can be difficult to choose the correct pronoun.

Error Correction
Diana is a better speller than me. Diana is a better speller than I.
He knows a lot more than her. He knows a lot more than she.
She plays basketball just as well as me. She plays basketball just as well as I.
We grew as much as them. We grew as much as they.

At this point you might be wondering why the left column of this chart sounds correct while thinking that the right side sounds a little strange. That's because it's perfectly acceptable to talk that way in casual conversation. However, in formal writing you must follow the examples in the right column. (There are cases in which it's okay to use an object pronoun after than or as, but doing so completely changes the meaning of the sentence.)

Hint:
Ask yourself what is missing in the sentence. That will guide you in choosing the correct pronoun.

Diana is a better speller than I (am).
He knows a lot more than she (does).
She plays basketball just as well as I (do).

In sentences with than or as, different pronouns can create different meanings.

Imaginary monsters scare my little brothers more than (they scare) me.
(The monsters don't scare me as much as they scare my little brothers.)

Imaginary monsters scare my little brothers more than I (scare them).
(I don't scare my little brothers as much as the monsters do.)

She likes him as much as (she likes) me.
(She likes both him and me equally.)

She likes him as much as I (do).
(Both she and I like him the same amount.)

Practice What You've Learned

English grammar

Part 1: Compounds

Directions:
Choose the pronoun that correctly completes each sentence.
1.
My friends and want to go to the beach this weekend.
I, me
2.
Don't give your father and any arguments.
I, me
3.
Ella and will be going to the zoo this weekend.
she, her
4.
The police officer asked and Lenny what they had seen.
he, him
5.
The car dealer should give both you and a good discount.
she, her
6.
That new computer game will keep Manuel and occupied for hours.
he, him
7.
If you don't hurry, both you and will be late for the movie.
he, him
8.
Please remind and the other players to bring our equipment to the game.
we, us
9.
My little cousin and found a nest with baby birds in it.
I, me
10.
Don't forget to give your new address to and your other relatives.
we, us

Part 2: Other Challenges

Directions:
Choose the pronoun that correctly completes each sentence.
11.
Carlos can run much faster than (can).
I, me
12.
animal trainers care deeply about all kinds of animals.
We, Us
13.
Can you find campers a good place to visit in Wyoming?
we, us
14.
In the winter, avid skiers love to visit Colorado.
we, us
15.
My father loves baseball as much as (do).
I, me
16.
That old blanket is more important to my sister than (it is to) .
I, me
17.
When we go to that restaurant, my father eats more than (do).
I, me
18.
Joey has not eaten as much pizza as (have).
I, me
19.
All my friends are better at sports than (am).
I, me
20.
Sonia is as interested in ice skating as (am).
I, me
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